“There’s Always Room for Improvement, but the Judges Are Looking for Big Airs & Stylish Tricks”

I don’t know about Big Airs but I’m pretty sure we’ve got some Stylish Tricks up our sleeves here at Wicket Labs. The inimitable words of Shaun White after his completion of a Double McTwist 1260 to win at the 2010 Vancouver Olympics truly express how we strive to keep improving the Wicket Scorecard.

We’re always striving for improvement and we take our customer’s feedback very seriously. Ultimately, we’re building our product to free up more of your time and allow you to take the insights from the Wicket Scorecard to gain a deeper understanding into your trialists, subscribers, content, and service engagement.

We have found that we can save data teams as much as 40 hours per week compiling reports from various, siloed data sources. This frees them up to focus on blind spots in the business that may have been impossible to see otherwise. Now, these teams are spending their time analyzing correlations in engagement data to connect viewers to the content they love. Boosting total viewing hours, driving engagement with the service, and increasing audience lifetime value.

We are continually iterating and improving the Wicket Scorecard based on your feedback and felt the timing was right to post an update on the things our engineers have been working so diligently. Some are aesthetic. Some are performance-based. ALL are important.

Refactored Heartbeat Metrics

One of the most notable updates our team has made is inspired directly from your feedback. When our customers are reviewing their performance data with their teams, it was important to have the ability to show this data across a period of time rather than just a snapshot of an average for the said time period. Besides, who wants to look at a bunch of numbers in a table when you can look at a beautiful, graphical representation???

heatbeat metrics with sparkline
Fig. 1 – Heartbeat Metrics, now with a sparkline to show historical data

So we refactored heartbeat metrics that sit directly below the KPI Wickets at the top of each tab. By adding a sparkline to each metric, our customers can now see how it has performed in relation to the initial time selection, located at the top of each tab.

Updated Graphing Technology

We’ve updated the technology we use behind the scenes for rendering the graphs on-screen. This comes with several areas of added benefit to our customers; the most important being an increase in performance. The technology allows our Wickets to be more responsive when loading.

chart with tooltip containing contextual data
Fig. 2- Tooltip with contextual information

On top of the performance increase, this update also allows for better aesthetics in a couple different ways. The Wickets not only look more pleasing to the eye but our tooltips now allow for a better presentation of information as you mouseover the data points on a chart or graph. You’ll notice the information that went into factoring the data points is now presented in an easy to see fashion on many Wickets.

Improved “Hours Viewed By” Wickets

Previously the “Hours Viewed By” Wicket presented the total hours viewed by device, channel, or product in a bubble chart that sought to visualize the total number of hours viewed based on the size of the bubble. But we felt this did not fully represent the amount of data surrounding the usage of each device. So we have now split this Wicket into two different charts. They show a better representation of the data for which our customers are looking.

The first chart is the Total Hours Viewed bar chart (Fig. 3). This chart now breaks down the total hours viewed by device/channel/product. In viewing the data this way, you get a very strong and fast indication of those performing best as well as areas where you may want to invest for improvements..

chart showing total hours viewed by device
Fig. 3 – Total Hours Viewed by Device

The second is the Average Hours Viewed bubble chart (fig. 4). When viewed in concert with the Total Hours Viewed chart, you can see how well the selected factor is performing not only by the total number but also by the average time being spent with each. This provides a more holistic view of the hours viewed data and allows for deeper insights beyond just looking at the total hours viewed on a specific device.

bubble chart showing average hours viewed
Fig. 4 – Average Hours Viewed by Device

Additional Timeline Views

Fig. 5 – Timeline Views Added

This is another update inspired by customer feedback. Outside of the standard options (week, month, 3 months, 6 months, 1 year) for visualizing your data, you wanted options that more closely matched up with your reporting requirements. Now our customers can see all of their Wickets with the ability to track the standard timeline options in addition to month-to-date, quarter-to-date, and year-to-date (Fig. 5), enabling them to better track their performance in relation to goals or targets they may have on a monthly, quarterly, or yearly basis.

Added The Lab

The final update, and possibly one of the most important is the addition of The Lab tab (Fig. 6) to The Wicket Scorecard. We wanted to create a sandbox or sorts within The Scorecard to allow our customers to try out new features with demo data as we refine them before launching it into the main Scorecard.

Fig. 6 – The Lab in the Wicket Scorecard

One of the best features of The Lab is the freedom to provide a large amount of contextual descriptions to ensure our customers understand the ins and outs of each Wicket that is presented on this tab. You can now participate in the prototyping of upcoming Wicket technology and help in shaping the product through your usage and feedback.

What’s Next?

We are regularly adding integrations and other features that will help our customers put more hours back into their day by using the Wicket Scorecard. We’re always interested in feedback, so hit us up with your thoughts and ideas!

Meanwhile, if you’d like a more thorough explanation of any of these updates or maybe a glimpse into the future of the Wicket Scorecard, please let us know. We’d be happy to walk you through.

 

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